• Reviews & Commentaries,  Tribute

    Viktor Frankl on Our Search for Meaning, and How to Find Ours

    If you’re a book aficionado, you must be somewhat familiar with the name Viktor Frankl, or at least on the book title “Man’s Search for Meaning”. If these don’t ring a bell, here’s a little excerpt explaining the book’s content taken from God Wikipedia: Man’s Search for Meaning is a 1946 book by Viktor Frankl chronicling his experiences as a prisoner in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, and describing his psychotherapeutic method, which involved identifying a purpose in life to feel positively about, and then immersively imagining that outcome. Wikipedia, as of 2019 Published originally in 1946, this book is divided into 2 main parts; Frankl’s personal experience…

  • Reviews & Commentaries

    How to Train Your Dragon 3: On Growing Up and Growing Apart

    Disclosure: I’m a sucker for animated films. Never have I failed to shed a tear watching Pixar and Dreamworks films. How to Train Your Dragon: Hidden World is no exception for me, if not way more emotional. The thing is, I missed the first and second film in 2010 and 2014, and had only watched both last year, so the plot and storyline were still deeply engraved in my memory. The thing about these animated films is that they are so beautifully made, you get sucked so easily in the surreal world of the film, and deep down you feel like seeing a glimpse of your own life in the…

  • Artworks,  Daily Philosophy

    Our Imagination is Not Imagination, At All

    But rather, a collection of pieces and bits from previously collected memories and mental images. Breaking my one year hiatus with a deductive reasoning writing (thesis first, supporting arguments and evidences later). So fun. Let me give some context to the background of this particular blog post. I’m a fond reader of philosophy and psychology in general, but have been rather lazy about it. Most of what I do is browse through¬†Brain Pickings, read books that look interesting and slightly related to them (review of “Man’s Search for Meaning” is coming up, by the way), and read existential crisis articles¬†here and there to try and at least scratch the surface…